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Edible East Bay | Soup’s On


Mama Tong Soup Owner Lindsey Ott

Simmering a Broth Business—Lindsey Ott first put the bone pot on the stove for the sake of her son’s teeth, but deciding to keep it there was more of an evolution.

The backstory is that when Ott’s boy was four years old, his dentist found small cavities in several teeth. While many parents would dutifully return the child to the dentist’s chair to be drilled, Lindsey instead tracked down a book mentioned by a friend who claimed to have cured her daughter’s cavities with dietary changes. Based on the work of Dr. Weston Price, Cure Tooth Decay, by Bay Area dad Ramiel Nagel, advocates for a diet of organ meats, bone broth, raw dairy, and vegetables in place of grains, seeds, nuts, and beans. After following the diet assiduously for four months, Ott returned her son to the dentist, who confirmed that the cavities had disappeared.

“Women have been tending the broth since the beginning of time. Virtually all cultures have made broths.”

At first, Lindsey simply liked the way having a pot of bone broth simmering away on the stove made her feel safe, “like there was something nourishing going on in my home.” As she perfected her broth, she began to appreciate the historical and cultural context of the soup pot. “Women have been tending the broth since the beginning of time. Virtually all cultures have made broths.” But the bottom line was that she felt better during the day and slept better when she had a cup of broth before bed. 

Bones imbue a broth with minerals like calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium in a form the body can easily absorb, and the concoctions are purported to provide powerful health benefits, including clearer skin, improved flexibility, and stronger immune systems. Amino acids such as glycine and proline—concentrated in bone broth but deficient in muscle meat—are said to aid digestive systems damaged or weakened by antibiotics . . . (Keep reading)